FAQs for Withdrawals Policy for Undergraduate Students

General

I'm thinking of withdrawing from the University entirely. Where do I start?

Leaving the University has significant academic and financial consequences.  The steps for withdrawing completely from the University can be found on the Office of the Registrar webpage.

Is withdrawing the best option?

This decision can potentially impact your academic and financial aid standing and should only be done if it is your only option.

What is a withdrawal?

A withdrawal refers to a course(s) students drop after the specified add/drop period.  A grade of "W" will appear on the transcript to denote the change to their enrollment.

What is the difference between a drop and a withdrawal?

A drop occurs when you remove yourself from a course before or during UNC Charlotte’s add/drop period. There are no academic consequences from this action, but there may be financial aid repercussions for this drop if you no longer meet aid qualifications. The course will show on your registration history as dropped but will not post on any unofficial or official transcripts and does not count as attempted credit.

A withdrawal from a course occurs when you remove yourself from a course after the add/drop period has passed. There will be financial repercussions for this withdrawal based on the refund schedule. 

The academic consequences from this action include receiving the grade of "W" for the course, which will appear on any unofficial or official transcripts.  A grade of "W" will not impact your GPA, but does not count as completed credit toward your degree which has implications for Satisfactory Academic Progress and Tuition Surcharge.

What is the withdrawal policy?

What should I do if my professor recommends I withdraw from a course?

Talk with your instructor.  Your instructor can inform you about your progress in a specific course based on the grading criteria stated in the syllabus and your participation and grades earned to date.  Your instructor may also be able to explore opportunities that may allow you to successfully complete the course in accordance with University guidelines and policies.

Who should I contact FIRST if I am thinking of withdrawing?

If you are considering withdrawing from a course, a good first point-of-contact is your academic advisor.  The advisor can help you strategize the best options, which will likely include speaking with your instructor, as well. 

Policy

Are dropped courses included within the 16 W-limit hours?

No, courses that are dropped during the add/drop period are not considered withdrawals and are not covered by this policy. 

Are Incomplete courses included within the 16 W-limit hours?

No, courses for which students have earned an Incomplete (I) are not considered withdrawals and are not covered by this policy. 

Can I use the Grade Replacement Policy to replace a W?

No, according to the Grade Replacement Policy, only courses for which a grade of A, B, C, D, or F were earned are eligible for grade replacement.

Do W’s count toward tuition surcharge?

Yes, Withdrawals count toward the total number of attempted credits according to the Tuition Surcharge Policy.

I was enrolled at UNC Charlotte prior to Fall 2014; what happened to my existing W’s?

Prior to Fall 2014, undergraduate students were not limited in the number of courses that could be withdrawn from in their academic career. Therefore, the count of withdrawals started with the Fall 2014 semester. Withdrawals prior to Fall 2014 are not included in the total.

If I am readmitted under the Forgiveness Policy, does my withdraw limit record continue from where I left off, or is it reset?

If you are granted readmission to the University based on either of the Forgiveness Policy, your withdraw limit will be reset at 16 credit hours.

If I must discontinue a course, having surpassed the withdrawal limit, and receive a D or F in the course, can I apply for grade replacement?

The grade replacement policy will continue to apply as currently stated.  See the Grading policy.

If you withdraw from a course that you currently registered as an audit, does that count as one of the 16 W-limit hours?

Yes, withdrawing from a course you are auditing will count towards your 16 W-limit hours.

If you withdraw from a course twice, does it count double towards the W-limit hours?

Yes, each time you withdraw from a course, the number of credits will be deducted from the 16 W-limit hours that you are allowed.

If you withdraw from a graduate course as an undergrad, does that count as one of the 16 W-limit hours?

If you are enrolled as an undergraduate degree-seeking student, withdrawing from a graduate course will count towards your 16 W-limit hours.

To whom does this policy apply?

The policy applies to all undergraduate students.  This policy does not apply to graduate students. 

What are the unit limits for withdrawal?

The limit is sixteen (16) credits. This policy only applies to undergraduate students.

What happens when I have reached my withdrawal limit, but need to withdraw anyway?

Unless you have extenuating cause that prevents you from continuing in the course (See Extenuating Circumstances below), you can expect to receive whatever grade is due in the course at the end of the semester.  You will also be responsible to pay 100% of the assessed tuition and fee charges.  Please consider the following two examples:

  • A student has already received W grades for 14 credit hours and thus has only 2 W-limit hours left. The student may not withdraw from a 3-credit course, but could withdraw from a 1- or 2-credit course.
  • Another student has12 remaining W-limit hours and is currently taking five 3-credit courses. The student would like to withdraw from all courses but lacks approved extenuating circumstances, and thus must choose at least one course in which to stay enrolled.

When did this policy take effect?

The count of withdrawals started in Fall 2014.  Withdrawals prior to Fall 2014 are not included in the total.

Why did the policy on withdrawing from courses change?

In January 2013, the University of North Carolina (UNC) General Administration transmitted a system-wide policy to all campuses within the UNC system; one aspect of the regulations related specifically to a cap on withdrawals (W’s) permitted to students.  In September 2013, the UNC Charlotte Faculty Council passed the above Withdrawals policy to comply with this regulation.  The goal of this cap on W’s is to encourage student success by reducing the number of unsuccessful course attempts and the undesired consequences that can have on student financial aid and timely graduation. 

Costs and Financial Aid

Are there financial aid implications?

The new withdraw policy does not change the regulations for financial aid eligibility as they currently exist.  When a student withdraws from just one course or the whole semester and receives grades of "W", these unearned grades can affect eligibility for financial aid programs.  Please refer to the Satisfactory Academic Progress section on the Student Financial Aid website to review the policy.

When a student withdraws from all of his/her courses, for any reason including medical withdrawals, he/she may no longer be eligible for the full amount of Title IV funds that he/she was originally scheduled to receive.

Students who withdraw from classes before completing over 60% of a semester may be required to repay all or a portion of the federal financial aid that he/she received for that term.

Are there veterans benefits implications?

Educational benefits for veterans/dependents will continue to require students to adhere to the same satisfactory academic progress criteria to qualify for funding.

Can I change my W’s to other courses once I’ve submitted my W request?

No, withdrawing from a course is a permanent action.  For additional information please contact your college Dean’s Office.

If I am readmitted to the University under the Forgiveness Policy and my withdrawals limit is reset, am I required to complete a Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form for the purposes of Financial Aid?

If you are not meeting the requirements of the Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) policy at the time you leave the University, you will be required to submit a Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form to request to have your financial aid reinstated upon your readmission.  Please refer to the Satisfactory Academic Progress section on the Student Financial Aid website to review the policy.

If I reach the 16 credit withdrawal limit, am I still eligible for financial aid?

Yes, as long as you are making Satisfactory Academic Progress. Please refer to the Satisfactory Academic Progress section on the Student Financial Aid website to review the policy.

If I withdraw from one course during the semester, will I owe money back?

Unless you have extenuating cause that prevents you from continuing in the course (see Extenuating Circumstances below), you will be responsible to pay 100% of the assessed tuition and fee charges.  If you are receiving financial aid, it is best to meet with a Financial Aid Assistant Director to seek guidance on how your financial aid will be affected due to each circumstance being different. The Office of Student Financial Aid is located on the 1st floor of the Reese Building.

What happens when I have reached my withdrawal limit, but need to withdraw anyway? Do I need to pay?

Unless you have extenuating cause that prevents you from continuing in the course (See Extenuating Circumstances below), you will be responsible to pay 100% of the assessed tuition and fee charges.

Extenuating Circumstances

By the time I heard my petition for a withdrawal for extenuating circumstances was denied, it was too late to withdraw and receive a W. May I still do so?

If the process of petitioning for a Withdrawal for extenuating circumstances was begun prior to the last date to withdraw (W) from the course, you may ask to be considered for a retroactive withdrawal.

Can I have extenuating circumstances that affect just one of my courses?

It depends.  Most extenuating circumstances affect all courses.  If it is determined that you have extenuating circumstances, the determination will be made on an individual basis.  

Do WE’s count toward my attempted hours?

Yes, Withdrawals for Extenuating Circumstances (WE) count toward the total number of attempted hours used in calculations for satisfactory academic progress. 

Do WE’s count toward tuition surcharge?

No, Withdrawals for Extenuating Circumstances (WE) do not count toward the total number of attempted credits according to the Tuition Surcharge Policy.

If I need to withdraw because of an emergency/illness, who should I contact? Where can I get information about this?

Information about requests for extenuating circumstances can be received from the Dean of Students Office.

What if I can’t submit my petition the same semester?

All requests for granting Withdrawals for extenuating circumstances requested after the posting of any semester grade must be made to the Associate Dean of the student’s academic college.